'ASCII Erika' looks at the materiality of computer code, and consists of a modified 1923 Erika typewriter and its written output.

Erika is modified in the way that its original typebars has been replaced with ASCII characters...

...produced with high resolution 3d printed steel parts.

Accordingly, graphics on the keyboard layout has also been altered.

This allows the Erika to write computer code!

WHY THE HELL? Read about it in the blogpost + check out more imgs on Flickr

DURR is a bracelet that shivers every 5 minutes, to investigate our sense of time passing.

durr_1

We made it to see how we experience the speed of time in different situations, watch this clip for a better explanation!

We've made 50, all by ourselves in our little cave in Oslo.

prosessbilde_bruk

It comes in 5 different colors: Asphalt, Banana Yellow, Fjord Blue, Cooked Salmon and Frosty Green.

durr_2

You can buy one in our skrekstore, among a few other things.

browser_frontpage_skrek

"Plugg" is a prototype DAB radio, investigating physical and metaphorical interaction with electronic devices.

plugg_1

A cork fits nicely into the hole where the radio's speaker sits beneath. By pushing the cork into this hole, the radio turns off...

plugg_3

...and by removing it, the radio turns itself on again.

plugg_2

Watch this clip to see it in action!

Several techniques were used in order to make the prototype work - among them 3d printing, laser cutting and hacking electronics.

plugg_4

The hardest part was really to make the on/off mechanism work - protip; don't combine magnetic switches with speakers (ran into this quite late in the process *x* )

plugg_5

The radio is just one example of this type of physical interaction, which we are compelled to continue working with. Check out more hi-res images on Flickr!
NXT PRJCT PLZ

plugg_6

With our (first) 3d printer we made an open-source-hardware-hack-kindle-back-cover.

cover1

Every teeny tiny bit of the original cover was measured, and extensive testing was necessary to make the replica fit tightly and safely; creating a template file other people can build upon.

cover2

We illustrated this with 4 different covers;
the first is based on this tweet...

cover3

...and the idea is that for every book you finish, you peel off one of the circles, representing that book.

cover5

For example, the six dots towards the bottom represents Hugh Howey's "Wool" series.

cover4

Second one improves the grip on the reader by adding a human ear (by Rubinstu) to the back of the reader.

cover6

Third is a typographic experiment with an 'If found…' text.

cover7

And fourth includes clasps for a moleskin notebook and a pencil.

cover8

Enough examples! Get the platform file on Thigiverse - Check out the How To - Read longer blogpost - More images on Flickr - And plz give us a heads up if you make your own!

cover9

We did dis lil webpage for a small film production company called 'Rollo Tomasi'.

rollo1

We also made the logo (they're so cool for being on board with that one). Here's a bit of the sketch prosess

rollo2

The site is in Norwegian, and g00gle translation somehow breaks the CSS, but here's the link anyway!

rollo3

Eye Track Three Dee is a conceptual utilization of the eye tracking technology to augment 3d space on a screen.

eye1

We think this could be really neat! You be like: 'Daaaaa, with glasses then?' We be like: 'No dude, cross our hearts'.

eye2

Video is worth more than a thousand images / a million words.

This is a projection installation we did for Borealis 2012, an alternative music festival in Bergen.

bor1

The crowd could press three buttons- each randomizing a word on the wall. Btw, the keyword for the festival was 'protest'.

bor2

We built a console that would be positioned in the middle of this hall...

bor3

...and hacked a keyboard connected to big glowing buttons.

bor4

Mmmm, big buttons.

bor5

Silly and sometimes naughty sentences were made, people danced and drank beer.

bor6

Watch video NOW NOW NOW! (face stuff next)

OK! It's quickly getting simpler analyzing webcam input in realtime, such as movement patterns, shape recognition and face detection.

ava1

Playing with ideas around this, we have been interested in translating the data these methods can supply in subtle ways. Especially concerning avatars.

ava1

Possible use in text chat could be interesting:

So would an alternative to video chat:

Lastly, using snapshot avatars in SMS:

Taking for granted a tool that makes it easy to create custom avatars, we did some sketches where they appear slightly more alive than static images.

There are aspects of these videos that could be useful, especially concerning privacy and connectivity issues. But you just want to see the next project, right?

talkie

Right. This was a curatorial project, designing and setting up an exhibition for the Design Research Center launch at AHO.

exhibition_01

Research leads to vast amounts of academic papers, and we wanted to not simplify or misinterpret anything. And so we tapered the room with posters containing the full articles previously published at AHO. Yup, that's a lot of text!

exhibition_02

But behind the massive text blocks were secrets; summaries and illustrations you'd only see clearly if you wore special glasses.
Behold the Essenceotrons!

exhibition_03

By wearing the Essenceotrons visitors filtered out the wishy-washy intellectual stuff, and the cyan visuals behind popped out as if black.

exhibition_04

Like bugs.

exhibition_08

We got the idea from those colored old-school 3d glasses, and went on duplicating the effect. It seemed people attending the exhibition appreciated it, as many of the Essenceotrons were stolen.

exhibition_06

To those of you who did steal a pair: keep them! They're yours!
To those of you who didn't: scroll to get to the next project.

exhibition_05

This is an installation for kids visiting the Geological Museum in Oslo.

geo1

Commissioned by and done with our genius friends at Voy, we at Skrekkøgle were responsible for designing models and graphics.

geo1

The goal was to teach kids about landscapes and types of rock, using games with simplified 3d visuals.

geo1

The games were enabled with small objects with an RFID chip inside, representing what's shown onscreen.

geo1

As we had to produce a bunch of these objects, we decided to make molding shapes for PUR from sintered models in silicone.

geo1

PUR11, a polyurethane version, is durable enough to survive kids' play. So we started molding.

geo1

With the result turning out successful, we assembled it all and attached the RFID chips.

geo1

It will be up at the museum for at least a year, with an expected 60 000 school kids visiting!

geo1

'Solitaire Win', a three dimensional sculpture of the old Windows game Solitaire.

solitaire_01

-because we love beating the game, watching all the cards hop around. Hop hop hop. It's the type of idea you would go 'It sounds fun, but that's ALOTTA work!'

solitaire_02

Over one thousand cards were cut out on black foam boards...

solitaire_03

...then customized and taped together.

solitaire_04

Tadah! The sculpture measures approximately 150 x 70 x 40 cm.

solitaire_05

Hop hop hop.

solitaire_06

You might go 'It comes across a bit different from the screen version, it doesn't look quite right'

solitaire_07

Well, even though one card's array should have a higher z-value (think css) than the previous array, the physical world only displays one z-value for each element in all arrays.

solitaire_08

So instead, we hierarchized the card's arrays by prioritizing the lowest card values in the intersections.

solitaire_09

Got it? Neat!

solitaire_010

Hop hop hop. Next project (put your sad face on)

solitaire_011

A friend of ours had his Gordon Setter cremated when she passed away.She was called Susie.

aske1

Instead of burying the urn with Susies remains, we decided to create a memorial item: a portrait printed with her ashes.

aske1

We rebuilt a printer to be able to use the ashes as printing material.

aske1

It was necessary to replace the ink; this way we could stick the remains to a dark background canvas.

aske1

Testing was performed with a variety of different materials, among them chocolate powder.

aske1

After repeated trial and error, we gained the necessary gear and experience to finalize: Susies remains were used to depict her portrait.

aske1

Now the portrait containing parts of Susies body resides on a shelf in our friends house, as an alternative to burying and hiding away what's left. Next project.

aske1

RBC = Really Big Coin

50c_1

This is our Really Big Coin. It is big because it makes other things look small when photographed next to it.

50c_1

Actually, it is a 20:1 replica of the EUR 50-cent, you see it being milled out here.

50c_1

We needed to do quite a bit of sanding, lacquering and smudging to obtain the desired look.

50c_1

And some climbing to get into required shooting position (you need to get up real high to take good pictures).

50c_1

The result is a short series of photographs, attempting to visually scale down real-sized objects.

50c_1

Such as a scooter.

50c_1

And a sportscar.

50c_1

BOOM! That's it! If you'd like to try it yourself, you can now download the coin from our webshop. Or just check out our netlog.

50c_1